The Outlaw

Jane Russell in one of the many publicity stills she took for The Outlaw (1943).  The film itself is mediocre, so the focus on her body was necessary for its box office appeal.

The Outlaw

after Howard Hawks abandoned The Outlaw (1943) to direct Sergeant York, Howard Hughes was left to direct the film himself.

The Outlaw

Jane Russell and Jack Buetel behind the scenes of The Outlaw (1943).  It was the third Howard Hawks release of the year, after Air Force and his production Corvette K225.  Hawks’ involvement in The Outlaw was limited to directing the first few scenes only.

The Outlaw

Japanese poster for The Outlaw (1943).  It finally premiered there Nov 1, 1952.

The Outlaw

 

title card from 1946 release of The Outlaw (1943).  The film didn’t get a wide release until Sep 1947.

Corvette K225

Ella Raines was another Howard Hawks discovery in Corvette K225 (1943), but the romance with Randolph Scott was routine and had none of the usual Hawks chemistry.

Air Force

two of the pilots in a screencap from Air Force (1943).  Howard Hawks wanted a cast of unknowns, but the Warner Brothers wanted some bankable stars such as John Garfield and Harry Carey.

Corvette K225

screencap from Corvette K225 (1943)

Air Force

foreign promotional booklet for Air Force (1943)

Air Force

George Tobias and Harry Carey in a screencap from Air Force (1943).  I can’t determine who’s under the plane.

Corvette K225

Barry Fitzgerald is one of the crew in a screencap from Corvette K225 (1943), a film produced by Howard Hawks and directed by Richard Rosson.  This was his final of 21 director credits dating back to 1917.  He also contributed to Hawks’ Scarface, Today We Live and Come and Get It.

Corvette K225

action scene from Corvette K225 (1943), Howard Hawks’ production for Universal Studios.

Corvette K225

Barry Fitzgerald is one of the Canadian sailors in Corvette K225 (1943), a middling Howard Hawks entertainment.

Air Force

original poster for Air Force (1943)

Air Force

 

The back of this publicity still reads

HE CAN DIE HAPPY   –    When John Ridgely was told that he was to play the pilot of a Boeing B17-E Flying Fortress in Warner Bros.’ “Air Force” he was delighted.  When he discovered that he had a death scene, right then and there his career was secured.  Death scenes are automatic dramatic highlights in any motion picture, even one with as much violent action as “Air Force.”  Here’s the happy Mr. Ridgely about to succumb, surrounded by members of his crew, which includes such favorites as John Garfield, Harry Carey and George Tobias, among others.

From Warner Bros. Studio

Burbank, California

John was also in Howard Hawks’ The Big Sleep, as Eddie Mars.