The Outlaw

Howard Hawks in a press release for The Outlaw (1943) with screen newcomers Jack Buetel and Jane Russell.  Hawks started working on the film in 1941, but soon left the project to direct Sergeant York.  Producer of the film, Howard Hughes, eventually directed.

The Outlaw

Australian poster for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

foreign poster for The Outlaw (1943)

The Outlaw

Jane Russell as Rio in a lopsided publicity still for The Outlaw (1943)

Air Force

print ad for Air Force (1943)

The Outlaw

The Outlaw (1943) was Howard Hawks’ 28th film as a director, and the third of which he started but did not finish.   As he did on The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933), he began directing the film, but dropped out after only a couple of weeks.

Air Force

original publicity still for Air Force (1943), perhaps the best contemporaneous film set during World War II.  Howard Hawks’ competition for the title includes John Ford’s They Were Expendable (1945).

Air Force

Air Force premiered Feb 3, 1943,  It won an Oscar for the editing, and was Howard Hawks’ 27th film.  Hawks was again working at Warner Brothers, his favorite and most frequent studio.

The Outlaw

The Outlaw premiered Feb 5, 1943 in San Francisco, and then again in San Francisco on Apr 23, 1946.  The New York premiere was Sep 1, 1947, with a wider release on Sep 12, 1947.  There was also a Jan 1950 re-release.

The Outlaw

print ad for The Outlaw (1943)

Ball of Fire

Master cinematographer Gregg Toland stands next to Tully Marshall on the set of Ball of Fire (1942) with Gary Cooper.  Gregg also worked with Howard Hawks on The Road to Glory and Come and Get It, and would work again on A Song is Born.

Air Force

Harry Carey and John Garfield in an original publicity still for Air Force (1943)

Air Force

Harry Carey and John Garfield in an original publicity still for Air Force (1943)

Air Force

original lobby card for Air Force (1943)

Ball of Fire

Gary Cooper and Dana Andrews in a scene from Ball of Fire (1942)