The Criminal Code

Boris Karloff in The Criminal Code (1931)

Advertisements

The Criminal Code

 

 

crim4

Phillips Holmes in a publicity still for The Criminal Code (1931)

The Criminal Code

original lobby card (1931)

The Criminal Code

original lobby card (1931)

The Criminal Code

original lobby card (1931)

The Criminal Code

The Criminal Code (1931) holds up quite nicely as an entertainment in the 21st century, much better than most films from 1931.   Howard Hawks had the magic touch.   Even his four weak films all have terrific highlights.

The Criminal Code

Yeah, Yeah, the inmates repeat Yeah, mocking warden Walter Huston in The Criminal Code (1931).

The Criminal Code

Boris Karloff as convict Galloway in a screencap from The Criminal Code (1931).

The Criminal Code

Letting convict Boris Karloff give you a close shave is never a good idea, in a screencap from The Criminal Code (1931).

The Criminal Code

the warden questions one of the inmates about having an affair with his daughter in a screencap from The Criminal Code (1931), Howard Hawks’ second sound film.

The Criminal Code

Howard Hawks in the upper left hand corner directing a prison scene from The Criminal Code (1931), his second sound film to be released.

The Criminal Code

It’s a risky idea to let convict Boris Karloff give you a shave in The Criminal Code (1931).

The Criminal Code

The convicts respond to warden Walter Huston with a loud chorus of YEAHs.

The Criminal Code

Warden Walter Huston tells it straight to convict Phillips Holmes in a screencap from The Criminal Code (1931) who happens to be Huston’s daughter’s boyfriend.

The Criminal Code

Boris Karloff is ready for his close up as convict Galloway in The Criminal Code (1931).  Boris had already made Scarface (1932) with Howard Hawks, but The Criminal Code was released first.  In between the two Haws films, Boris was seen for the first of three times as the Monster in Frankenstein (1931).