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Olive Borden is the model and Andre de Beranger is the designer in Fig Leaves (1926).

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model in a gown by Adrian in the lost Technicolor fashion show from Fig Leaves (1926)

This is also the cover of the coffee table book “The Dawn of Technicolor 1915-1935″ celebrating the 100th anniversary of color in the movies.  Typically there is no mention of Hawks or the film, other than the cover photo and in the appendix, although the book is very scholarly with great detail.

According to The Dawn of Technicolor, Howard Hawks’ Fig Leaves premiered Aug 22, 1926 and 248 prints were made including two Technicolor sequences.  The first occurs at the end of Reel 3 with Andre deBeranger, Olive Borden, William Austin and a group of lingerie models in a fashion salon.  The scene is intercut with shots tinted light amber.  The second color sequence occurs at the beginning of reel 6 and features a contemporary fashion show.  George O’Brien enters the salon and sees Olive Borden posing in a decollete evening gown.  Only a fragment survives of the original color elements.

Olive Borden’s wardrobe for Fig Leaves was $50,000, including a costume as Eve.  75 models were featured in the color fashion show, wearing gowns designed by Adrian.  Hawks remembered ordering the fashion show set to be finished in black and silver without any hint of color, highlighting the colored gowns effectively when photographed in Technicolor

 

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Olive Borden, as Eve, is part of a fashion show in Fig Leaves (1926).  The gowns were all created by relative newcomer Adrian.  Hawks got the idea for a chic fashion show from his time as production editor at Paramount on The Dressmaker from Paris (1925).  Olive was one of the “mannequins” in the earlier production’s fashion show.

Adrian (Adrian Greenburg) had 266 costume design credits through 1952.  His big break came in 1922 when he was hired by Irving Berlin to create costumes on Broadway.  His first film credit was in 1923.

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original lobby card for Fig Leaves (1926)

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Olive Borden and George O’Brien are a modern Adam and Eve sleeping in twin beds in a publicity still for Fig Leaves (1926).  Eve can cover her ears, but she doesn’t avert her eyes.  Howard Hawks’ second film as a director, and his first hit, is his first to exploit the sexual chemistry between two likable and attractive stars.

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magazine article on Fig Leaves, Howard Hawks’ second film.  It premiered in London on Aug 11, 1926 and Aug 22 in the US.  Since his first film, the serious minded The Road to Glory, was not a hit, Hawks rebounded with a comedy spectacle that included a now lost technicolor fashion show.  His first cinematic fashion show, The Dressmaker from Paris (1925), merely featured Olive Borden.  Here she is the main attraction, as seen in the bottom photo.  Fig Leaves is the first Hawks film to survive, although the fashion show is missing.

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foreign poster for Fig Leaves (1926), Howard Hawks’ second film as a director, and oldest surviving, although in inferior prints.

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Olive Borden in a print photo for Fig Leaves (1926)

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print ad for Fig Leaves (1926)

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the surviving parts of Fig Leaves (1926).  Howard Hawks originally filmed a Technicolor fashion show, missing from all known copies.

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pre-release flyer for Fig Leaves (1926). Howard Hawks’ second silent film as director, and his oldest surviving film.   His first film, The Road to Glory (1926)  is lost.

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Olive Borden and Andre deBeranger in Fig Leaves (1926)

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George O’Brien and Olive Borden as Adam and Eve in Fig Leaves (1926)

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Olive Borden as a contemporary Eve in Fig Leaves (1926)

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Kenneth Hawks was Howard’s brother who had a promising career as a film director, but he was tragically killed in a plane crash with nine others while filming aerial scenes for his third film.  Kenneth was married to Mary Astor at the time.  Even in 1926 Howard was commanding everyone’s attention with his low-key, soft spoken manner.