Monkey Business

Cary Grant wears glasses as scientist Barnaby Fulton in a publicity still with Ginger Rogers for Monkey Business (1952), as he did as paleontologist David Huxley in another Howard Hawks comedy, Bringing Up Baby.

 

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Monkey Business

Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers as Barnaby and Edwina Fulton in a publicity still for Monkey Business (1952).

Monkey Business

Robert Cornthwaite, Cary Grant and Marilyn Monore (1952).  Robert was also part of the scientific team in Howard Hawks’ The Thing.

Monkey Business

Ginger Rogers as Edwina Fulton in a publicity still for Monkey Business (1952).  Ben Hecht’s screenplay did not include Edwina taking the drug B4, but Ginger had the idea of doing a nifty balancing act with a glass of water while under the influence, and she and Cary did a fun little Laurel and Hardy routine.

Monkey Business

Edwina tries to convince Barnaby’s boss, Mr, Oxley, that her husband has turned into a toddler while under the influence of the drug B4 in Monkey Business (1952).

Monkey Business

Barnaby Fulton eyeballs Hank Entwhistle while Edwina chats with her mother in a publicity still for Monkey Business (1952).

Monkey Business

The effects of the drug B4 appear to be kicking in for Cary Grant as scientist Barnaby Fulton in Monkey Business (1952).

Monkey Business

Cary Grant and Marilyn Monroe filming Monkey Business (1952), their only film together.  It was still relatively early in Marilyn’s career, as she was only the second female lead.

Monkey Business

Cary and Ginger in a publicity still for Monkey Business (1952).  They previously worked together on the middling Once Upon a Honeymoon (1942).

Monkey Business

Cary Grant with his secretary Marilyn Monroe as Miss Laurel and his boss Charles Coburn as Mr. Oxley in a publicity still for Monkey Business (1952).  Marilyn and Charles were both in Howard Hawks’ next film at 20th Century Fox, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).

Monkey Business

Cary Grant demonstrates the effects of the drug B4

Cary Grant demonstrates the effects of the youth drug B4 in Monkey Business (1952)

Monkey Business


Bottoms up !  Cary Grant researches the effects of B4 with his wife Ginger Rogers in Monkey Business (1952)

Monkey Business


Marilyn Monroe was only the second female lead in Monkey Business (1952) but she tierelessly promoted the film like she was already a superstar.

Monkey Business

Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers as Barnaby and Edwina Fulton in Monkey Business (1952)

Monkey Business


Cary Grant takes a youth serum, B4, and finds a public swimming pool in order for Marilyn Monroe to model swimwear and high heels in Monkey Business (1952)