The Outlaw

Billy the Kid and Doc Holliday in a 1950 re-release publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

Advertisements

The Outlaw

Jack Buetel on the bed as Walter Huston and Jane Russell stand over him in The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Fresh faces Jane Russell and Jack Buetel smile for a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Billy the Kid and Rio in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Jack Buetel out of character as Billy the Kid in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).  All the publicity and controversy over his film debut didn’t lead to much of a career, as all the publicity was focused on his co-star Jane Russell.

The Outlaw

I don’t recall Jane Russell holding a baby in any scene from The Outlaw (1943).  She’s not in costume, so maybe it’s another attempt to mute her sex appeal.

The Outlaw

out6

Howard Hawks worked only briefly on The Outlaw (1943).  He left the project in order to direct Sergeant York (1941) which turned out to be his only Oscar nomination.  It’s doubtful that anything Hawks filmed is in Howard Hughes’ final version.

The Outlaw

Jack Buetel was signed to a long term contract with Howard Hughes for his film debut in The Outlaw (1943), but Hughes did not put him back on the screen for seven years.  Jack then found work mostly on tv, and retired in 1961.

The Outlaw

 

Rio has the upper hand over Billy the Kid as he recuperates in his sick bed in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Jane Russell is out of character in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).  While the publicity for the film focused on Jane’s sex appeal and voluptuous figure, this publicity photo promotes her as the girl next door with four unknown teen boys not seen in the film.

Corvette K225

publicity still with caption on the back for Corvette K225 (1943).

The Outlaw

Jane Russell in a publicity still for her film debut in The Outlaw (1943).

Jane was the first actress in Hollywood best known for her physical attributes.   In the 30s the only female stars with big breasts were Mae West and Betty Boop.  Mae was already in her 40s when her film career took off, and, of course, Betty was only a cartoon.

The Outlaw

Jane Russell and Jack Buetel in The Outlaw (1943)

The Outlaw

Jane Russell in an original publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).  Howard Hawks worked on the film for only a couple of weeks in 1941.  It’s unclear if any of his scenes remain in Howard Hughes’ finished product.  Howard was reunited with Jane 10 years later when she co-starred with Marilyn Monroe in Hawks’ Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).

The Outlaw

The Outlaw is Howard Hawks’ 28th film, although it’s unclear if any of the footage he shot remains in Howard Hughes’ final version.

The Outlaw premiered Feb 5, 1943 in San Francisco and was quickly withdrawn.  It’s next public showing was Apr 23, 1946, again in San Francisco.  It finally opened in New York City on Sep 1, 1947 ahead of its first general release on Sep 12, 1947.