The Road to Glory

The Road to Glory premiered Feb 7, 1926 in the US, Mar 25 in London, and Sep 3 in France.  This is Howard Hawks’ first film as a director, although he is mentioned twice in this ad, as the film’s writer and producer.

It was not a success, despite a wide international release.  Hawks understood it was too serious and depressing, which he corrected with his second release.  Nothing survives from the film.

The Road to Glory (1926)

May McAvoy in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1926), Howard Hawks’ lost first film as a director.

The Road to Glory

The Road to Glory (1926) was Howard Hawks’ first credit as director.  He was also credited with the original story.  While he usually had a hand in the story and script, this is his only on screen credit as writer and director.  Previous to his first director credit, he did have a few story credits.

The Road to Glory

The Road to Glory (1925) is Howard Hawks’ first film as a director, but it is now lost.  There are almost no surviving publicity materials either, so this is a reblog.

The Road to Glory

May McAvoy on a crowded dance floor in an original publicity still for The Road to Glory (1926).

The Road to Glory

The Road to Glory is Howard Hawks’ first film as a director, and bears no relation to his 1936 film with the same title.

The Road to Glory premiered Feb 7, 1926

The Road to Glory

original lobby card for The Road to Glory (1926).

The Road to Glory

 

May McAvoy and Leslie Fenton in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1926).  Howard Hawks directed based on his own original story.

The Road to Glory

May McAvoy and Leslie Fenton in The Road to Glory (1926), the story of a woman blinded in an auto accident who regains her sight with the power of prayer.  Howard Hawks said “It was a very dramatic, serious, downbeat story.  It didn’t have any fun in it.  It was pretty bad.”   No prints survive so we cannot confirm Hawks’ assessment.