The Road to Glory

 

Warner Baxter and June Lang are a forgettable couple in The Road to Glory (1936).  June is more memorable in her scenes with Fredric March.

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The Road to Glory

 

June Lang in a retitled rerelease publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).  June was born in Minneapolis and had 45 acting credits in her career, from an uncredited extra in 1931, to a 1968 tv episode.  June’s promising career stalled in 1938 when she was filming on location in England and was so concerned about World War II which had not yet penetrated the American consciousness, she could not complete the film, and was fired at 20th Century Fox.  Shortly thereafter she married a disreputable Chicago mobster, ending her career with poverty row productions and a few guest shots on tv.  Her career highlights include Bonnie Scotland with Laurel and Hardy, Captain January with Shirley Temple, and John Ford’s Wee Willie Winkie, as Shirley Temple’s mother.

The Road to Glory

 

 

 

June Lang as Monique La Coste in The Road to Glory (1936).  She is an adequate Hawksian woman, something of a “place holder” for a better, more charismatic screen presence.

The Road to Glory

Victor Kilian is the tall Sergeant in the middle of a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).  Victor was also part of the team in Howard Hawks’ Only Angels Have Wings (1939).

The Road to Glory

June Lang has a tough time choosing between Fredric March and Warner Baxter in The Road to Glory (1936).

The Road to Glory

Warner Baxter is the Captain and Fredric March is the Lieutenant in The Road to Glory (1936).

The Road to Glory

Warner Baxter in a publicity still for the retitled rerelease of The Road to Glory (1936).  Warner was born in Columbus, Ohio and had 108 acting credits in his career, from an uncredited bit in 1918 to 1950.  His career highlights include the title role of an unseen 1926 version of The Great Gatsby, as The Cisco Kid in In Old Arizona (1928) for which he won a Best Actor Oscar, 42nd Street (1933), and 10 features as Crime Doctor (1943-49).

The Road to Glory

Fredric March and June Lang in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936), Howard Hawks’ first sound film at 20th Century Fox, after making all eight of his silent films at the studio.

The Road to Glory


 

Warner Baxter as World War I Capt Paul LaRoche in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936)

The Road to Glory

 

Warner Baxter in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936), a watchable and entertaining Howard Hawks effort.  The film is strongly cast, including Fredric March and Lionel Barrymore, with excellent action scenes, an interesting story, and a sense of life in the trenches during World War I, but overall the film is a notch below Hawks’ numerous masterpieces.

The Road to Glory


Lionel Barrymore in The Road to Glory (originally titled Zero Hour)

Lionel Barrymore as Private Morin in a publicity still from the rerelease of The Road to Glory (1936), retitled Zero Hour.  It is also known as Wooden Crosses.

The Road to Glory


Warner Baxter and Victor Killian in a publicity still for the rerelease of The Road to Glory (1936), retitled Wooden Crosses.  Victor was also in Howard Hawks’ Only Angels Have Wings.  He was also seen on tv in Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman as The Fernwood Flasher.

The Road to Glory

Fredric March in a publicity still for The Road To Glory

Fredric March in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).  Fredric is perhaps neglected in the 21st century, but in his time he was one of the most popular and critically acclaimed actors.  He was a two time Best Actor Oscar winner, for Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1931) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1945).  Fredric’s career ran from an uncredited bit in 1921 through 1973.  He was also Willie Loman in the rarely seen 1951 version of Death of a Salesman.

The Road to Glory

Gregory Rataff as an unnamed Russian soldier and Lionel Barrymore as a soldier past his prime in The Road to Glory (1936), retitled Zero Hour for rerelease.

The Road to Glory

Fredric March in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936), retitled Zero Hour.  The film is better than average, but since Howard Hawks has so many other classic masterpieces, the film is overlooked.  It is also rarely seen and has never been released on home video, laser or dvd.