The Road to Glory

Fredric March and June Lang in a screencap from The Road to Glory (1936).  Fredric had a great career before and after The Road to Glory, but June couldn’t capitalize on a fine performance in her big break.

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The Road to Glory

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The stars of The Road to Glory (1936) in a publicity still.

The Road to Glory

print ad for The Road to Glory (1936)

The Road to Glory

Fredric March in a screencap from The Road to Glory (1936), Howard Hawks’ return to 20th Century Fox, after directing eight silent films at the studio.  Like their neglect of Hawks’ silent films, The Road to Glory has never had a proper home video release, and is ripe for a restoration.

The Road to Glory

Warner Baxter, Gregory Ratoff and Fredric March are in the World War I trenches in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).

The Road to Glory

Fredric March and Lionel Barrymore get down to shield themselves from the effects of World War I in a screencap from The Road to Glory (1936).

The Road to Glory

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Fredric March and June Lang in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936), Howard Hawks’ second World War I film, after The Dawn Patrol.  Today We Live is also set during World War I, but most of the film takes place with Joan Crawford back home in an unconvincing  England.  Air Force was his World War II film.

The Road to Glory

Warner Baxter and June Lang in a publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).

The Road to Glory

Fredric March in a screencap from The Road to Glory (1936).  Two men and a girl is a common theme in Howard Hawks’ career, from A Girl in Every Port (1928) to El Dorado (1966).

The Road to Glory

Howard Hawks on the set of The Road To Glory. This was the first time Hawks returned to Twentieth Century Fox since making all of his 8 silent films there,

Howard Hawks shares a meal with the cast and crew of The Road to Glory (1936) at 20th Century Fox studios.  He made all eight of his silent films for the studio, with this being his first sound film there.

The Road to Glory

Howard Hawks in the director’s chair on the set of The Road to Glory (1936) with Warner Baxter.

The Road to Glory

Howard Hawks on the set of The Road to Glory (1936) with the great cinematographer Gregg Toland to the left of the camera.  Gregg went on to photograph Hawks’ next movie, Come and Get It, as well as Ball of Fire, and Hawks’ first color film, A Song is Born.  Gregg also was behind the camera for Citizen Kane.

The Road to Glory

 

Warner Baxter and June Lang are a forgettable couple in The Road to Glory (1936).  June is more memorable in her scenes with Fredric March.

The Road to Glory

 

June Lang in a retitled rerelease publicity still for The Road to Glory (1936).  June was born in Minneapolis and had 45 acting credits in her career, from an uncredited extra in 1931, to a 1968 tv episode.  June’s promising career stalled in 1938 when she was filming on location in England and was so concerned about World War II which had not yet penetrated the American consciousness, she could not complete the film, and was fired at 20th Century Fox.  Shortly thereafter she married a disreputable Chicago mobster, ending her career with poverty row productions and a few guest shots on tv.  Her career highlights include Bonnie Scotland with Laurel and Hardy, Captain January with Shirley Temple, and John Ford’s Wee Willie Winkie, as Shirley Temple’s mother.

The Road to Glory

 

 

 

June Lang as Monique La Coste in The Road to Glory (1936).  She is an adequate Hawksian woman, something of a “place holder” for a better, more charismatic screen presence.