Today We Live

Gary Cooper as Bogard in Today We Live (1933), the first of three films he made with Howard Hawks. The other two, Sergeant York and Ball of Fire, were much more successful. Today We Live is one of only four weak Hawks films.

Today We Live

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foreign flyer for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

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first page of magazine article on Today We Live (1933).  MGM had a big advertising budget for the film, but it couldn’t attract moviegoers.  It is one of four weak Howard Hawks film.  The blame here lies with the studio for adding Joan Crawford to the cast when it was too late for a proper re-write.  As always with Hawks, the action scenes were strong.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford was unconvincing as British noble woman Diana in a publicity still for Today We Live (1933).  She was added to the cast at the last second, without time to do a proper re-write.  The film was released at 113 minutes, after negative audience response at the 135 minute previews.  It would be interesting to see the 22 minutes that got  cut.

Today We Live

foreign flyer for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Roscoe Karns, Gary Cooper and Franchot Tone see action in World War I in Today We Live (1933).  As always, the Howard Hawks filmed action scenes, on land, sea and air, are terrific, but the story is weak.

 

Today We Live

Howard Hawks directing Franchot Tone, and under the cot, Joan Crawford and Robert Young, in Today We Live.  The film premiered Mar 3, 1933, and was Hawks’ 14th credit as a director.

The back of this foreign publicity still for Today We Live (1933) reads

Joan Crawford, Robert Young y Franchot Tone, filmando cierta escena de una pelicula de la Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.  Junto a la camera el director Howard Hawks observa atenatmonte.

 

Today We Live

Gary Cooper in Today We Live (1933), his first of three films with Howard Hawks.  The other two, Sergeant York and Ball of Fire, were critical and commercial successes

Today We Live

Joan Crawford in Today We Live (1933), photographed by Oliver T Marsh.  Ollie was born in Kansas City, and had 133 credits from 1916 to 1941.  Long at MGM, his highlights include other Joan Crawford films, Possessed (1931),  Rain (1932), and again in Dancing Lady (1933).  His other notable credits include David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, The Great Ziegfeld, and San Francisco, featuring the famous earthquake.

Today We Live

Franchot Tone, Joan Crawford and Robert Young in Today We Live (1933).  This was Hawks’ first failure as a director., despite William Faulkner’s dialogue.  Joan Crawford was added at the last minute by MGM executives, leaving no time for a proper re-write.

Today We Live

Robert Young, Franchot Tone, and Joan Crawford in Today We Live (1933).  The World War I England background was unconvincing.

Today We Live

Louise Closser Hale and Joan Crawford in a scene from Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Spanish flyer for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Spanish poster for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Spanish poster for Today We Live (1933)