Today We Live

Not even the massive MGM publicity department, all the big stars and Pulitzer Prize winner William Faulkner could save Today We Live (1933).

 

Advertisements

Today We Live

Gary Cooper was under contract to Paramount Studios when he was loaned to MGM for Today We Live (1933), but then was saddled with Joan Crawford who was a late addition to the production.  This was their only film together.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford in a publicity still for Today We Live (1933).  The film was a critical and commercial flop.  Howard Hawks would never again work at MGM.

Today We Live

Franchot Tone and Joan Crawford as Ronnie and Diana in Today We Live (1933), an unsuccessful attempt by William Faulkner at a Hollywood screenplay, ruined by MGM studio interference.

Today We Live

Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford in a publicity still for Today We Live (1933).  While Howard Hawks would never again work at MGM, he worked with Gary Cooper on the much more successful Sergeant York and Ball of Fire.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford unsuccessfully juggles Franchot Tone and Robert Young, not to mention  Gary Cooper too, in Today We Live (1933).

Today We Live

Franchot Tone and Joan Crawford first met while filming Today We Live (1933).  They were married in 1935 and divorced in 1939.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford’s costumes for Today We Live (1933) were widely mocked and unrealistic for World War I England.

Today We Live

Robert Young and Joan Crawford as Claude and Diane are unconvincing in Today We Live (1933).  Joan was added to the cast at the last minute, throwing everything but the action scenes out the window.

Today We Live

Robert Young, Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone in a publicity still for Today We Live (1933), another Howard Hawks triangle.  While Franchot has eyes for Robert, he married Joan two years later.

Today We Live

Gary Cooper as Lt Richard Bogard in Today We Live (1933).  Gary made two more films with Howard Hawks.  Both were much more successful and rewarding.  In 1941 Gary earned an Oscar as Sergeant York, and the following year he was Professor Potts opposite Barbara Stanwyck in the comedy classic Ball of Fire.

Today We Live

More emphasis seems to have been placed on Joan Crawford’s publicity stills for Today We Live (1933) than on a dramatically interesting story, despite the involvement of William Faulkner.

Today We Live

In addition to Gary Cooper as Lt Bogard, Joan Crawford was also romanced by Robert Young as Lt Claude Hope and Franchot Tone as Lt Ronnie Boyce-Smith in Today We Live (1933), a dramatically weak effort except for the action highlights.

Today We Live


Joan Crawford appears unselfconscious in some kind of clown costume for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Today We Live is Howard Hawks’ 14th film.

Today We Live premiered Mar 3, 1933.