Twentieth Century

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original British presskit for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

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Carole Lombard had been floundering in Hollywood until she was cast opposite silent screen legend John Barrymore in Twentieth Century (1934), John’s only good sound film as a leading man.

Twentieth Century

 

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John Barrymore in disguise as Oscar “OJ” Jaffe in an original publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in a publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934), with the description on the back.

Twentieth Century

Twentieth Century premiered May 3, 1934.  It was Howard Hawks’ 17th picture as director.

Twentieth Century

foreign poster for Twentieth Century (1934).  Neither of the film’s great stars, John Barrymore and Carole Lombard would be alive to see the end of World War II.

Twentieth Century

foreign poster for Twentieth Century (1934).  It’s a tough call on which of the stars, John Barrymore or Carole Lombard is the bigger “prima donna.”

Twentieth Century

 

Howard Hawks and the cast of Twentieth Century (1934).  It was Howard’s 17th film, and second at Columbia Pictures, after The Criminal Code.

Twentieth Century

original presskit for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

original poster for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore scolds Carole Lombard in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

one of the original posters for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in an original publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

The OJ initials are for Broadway director Oscar Jaffe in Twentieth Century (1934).  His discovery, Carole Lombard, is not impressed,

Twentieth Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore face off on the Twentieth Century (1934), a luxury, first class railroad line of the day.