The Criminal Code

Boris Karloff is ready for his close up as convict Galloway in The Criminal Code (1931).  Boris had already made Scarface (1932) with Howard Hawks, but The Criminal Code was released first.  In between the two Haws films, Boris was seen for the first of three times as the Monster in Frankenstein (1931).

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The Dawn Patrol

 

Richard Barthelmess and Douglas Fairbanks prepare for war in The Dawn Patrol (1930).

The Dawn Patrol

The Dawn Patrol (1930) was the first sound film to win an Oscar for Best Writing, Original Story, for John Monk Saunders, although Howard Hawks’ contribution to story and screenplay was significant.

The Dawn Patrol

The Dawn Patrol (1930) was remade in 1938, almost word for word, and using the same action scenes filmed by Howard Hawks, who was also one of the German pilots.

The Criminal Code

The Criminal Code (1931) was Howard Hawks’ first film at Columbia Studios. His biggest success at the studio was His Girl Friday (1940).

Scarface

Paul Muni in his film debut as Scarface (1932).

Scarface

Paul Muni likes what he sees as Scarface (1932).

Scarface

Paul Muni made his screen debut as Scarface (1932). leading to an acting career with 29 credits, and an Academy award for The Story of Louis Pasteur, through a tv episode in 1962.

Scarface

Tony Camonte and Guido Rinaldo bring flowers to their next victim in Scarface (1932).

Scarface

Vince Barnett, in the middle, is Tony Camonte’s “seck-a-terry” and wing man in Scarface (1932).

Scarface

George Raft and Vince Barnett crouch over a victim in Scarface (1932) as Tony Camonte makes a point.

Scarface

 

Paul Muni has plenty of swag in Scarface (1932).

Scarface

 

brother and sister in Scarface (1932)

Scarface

Scarface (1932) was Howard Hawks’ first sound film, but because of lengthy censorship battles, The Dawn Patrol and The Criminal Code were released first.

Scarface

Another crowd gathers around Scarface (1932).