Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane Russell in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

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The Outlaw

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Jane Russell in an original publicity still for The Outlaw (1943)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell promoting Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) at Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

The Outlaw

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newcomers Jack Buetel and Jane Russell in an original publicity still for The Outlaw (1943)

The Outlaw

Jack Buetel as Billy the Kid and Jane Russell as Rio made their film debuts in The Outlaw (1943), directed by Howard Hughes after Howard Hawks left after a week or two to direct Sergeant York.  There’s no telling what the finished product would have been like if Hawks completed the film.  As it stands, there are only a couple of memorable scenes with Jane in an otherwise mediocre western.

The Outlaw

Screen newcomers Jane Russell and Jack Buetel get married in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

 

JaJane Russell in an autographed publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Fresh faces Jane Russell and Jack Buetel in a publicity still for The Outlaw (1943).

The Outlaw

Jane Russell in a provocative newspaper article promoting her film debut in The Outlaw (1943).  It didn’t see a widespread release until 1946.

The Outlaw

Jane Russell out of costume in an original publicity still for The Outlaw (1943)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane and Marilyn are ready to set sail for Europe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane Russell in a publicity still for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), the best known film of her career.   She is also known for The Paleface opposite Bob Hope.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane Russell as Dorothy Shaw in a publicity still for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).  Jane briefly worked with Howard Hawks when he started filming The Outlaw in 1941, bowing out to work on Sergeant York instead.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe are bff’s in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), a relationship not seen very often in Hollywood.  Much preferred is the stereotypes seen in The Women (1939) who are constantly scheming against each other for the upper hand.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Marilyn and Jane in an autographed photo from their publicity stunt in front of Grauman’s Chinese Theater a week before the premiere of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).