Twentieth Century

John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in a publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934), with the description on the back.

Twentieth Century

 

Howard Hawks and the cast of Twentieth Century (1934).  It was Howard’s 17th film, and second at Columbia Pictures, after The Criminal Code.

Howard Hawks’ early career

The Lotus Eater premiered Nov 27, 1921, a film “personally directed” by Marshall Neilan.  Were other films of the day impersonally directed?  John’s previous film was his first big hit, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and his next film was Sherlock Holmes, another popular film.

Howard Hawks’ early career

John Barrymore and Colleen Moore in a publicity still for The Lotus Eater (1922).  John somehow stumbles onto an island inhabited by a group of shipwrecked folk who create their own free thinking, liberal society far from civilization.  It was not one of John’s more popular films, and it is unlikely John met Howard Hawks at this time, as location shooting for the film was in New York and Miami.

Howard Hawks’ early career

John Barrymore in The Lotus Eater (1921).  Marshall Neilan directed for Howard Hawks’ Associated Producers group, but it is unlikely Hawks and Barrymore met until filming of Twentieth Century in 1934.

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore scolds Carole Lombard in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in an original publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

The OJ initials are for Broadway director Oscar Jaffe in Twentieth Century (1934).  His discovery, Carole Lombard, is not impressed,

Twentieth Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore face off on the Twentieth Century (1934), a luxury, first class railroad line of the day.

Twentieth Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore are a perfect couple in Twentieth Century (1934).  It was John’s best performance in a sound film, and it was Carole’s big break.

Twentieth Century

the camera meets the two lovebirds on the floor in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore as theater director Oscar Jaffe in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

John Barrymore as stage director Oscar Jaffe in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934).  He was “The Great Profile” and one of the biggest stars of the silent era, but this is his only worthy starring role in a talking picture.  His only other good talkies are Grand Hotel and Midnight, neither of which he receives top billing.

Twentieth Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)

Twentieth Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore in a screencap from Twentieth Century (1934)