20th Century

Carole Lombard is trailed by jealous Oscar Jaffe’s minions Roscoe Karns and Walter Connelly in Twentieth Century (1934)

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20th Century

Carole Lombard shows off her legs in a pre-code publicity still with John Barrymore for Twentieth Century (1934)

20th Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore in Twentieth Century (1934).  John was considered one of the greatest actors and stars of the silent era, and was nicknamed The Great Profile.  His career in sound films was generally unrewarding, with Twentieth Century his only great star vehicle.  He was also well cast in Grand Hotel (1932) which is more of an ensemble piece, and Midnight (1939) as a supporting player in a Billy Wilder script.

20th Century

Carole Lombard and John Barrymore on board the 20th Century Limited. the railroad’s finest transportation of the day, in Twentieth Century (1934) at a time when popular air travel was still in its infancy.

20th Century

Carole Lombard seems to regret taking up with Ralph Forbes after splitting up with John Barrymore in Twentieth Century (1934)

20th Century

Twentieth Century is Howard Hawks’ 17th film.

Twentieth Century premiered May 3, 1934

20th Century

behind the scenes of Twentieth Century (1934) with Etienne Girardot, John Barrymore, Carole Lombard, and Roscoe Karns.

20th Century


Carole Lombard gets a name change from Mildred Plotnik to Lily Garland in Twentieth Century (1934).  Carole was never seen to memorable effect in a forgettable film career, until teaming up with John Barrymore for Howard Hawks who provided her with the first real display of her unique comedic talents, which she continued to exhibit throughout the 30s.

20th Century

The battle of the sexes is between stage director Oscar Jaffe and his star creation Lily Garland in Twentieth Century (1934)

20th Century

Carole Lombard barely keeps it covered in a pre code publicity still for Twentieth Century (1934) with John Barrymore.