Barbary Coast


Miriam Hopkins as Mary Rutledge, nicknamed Swan, in a publicity still for Barbary Coast (1935).  Miriam was born in Savannah, Georgia and had 53 acting credits in her career, from a 1928 short to 1970.  Miriam was one of the biggest stars of the 30s, with numerous box office hits of the day.  Her highlights include Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1932), Trouble in Paradise, The Story of Temple Drake, Design for Living, Beck Sharp (the first three strip Technicolor feature, in 1935), These Three, The Old Maid, Virginia City, Old Acquaintance, and The Heiress.

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Barbary Coast

Miriam Hopkins arrives in town to some bad news in Barbary Coast (1935).

Barbary Coast

Joel McCrae romances Miriam Hopkins in Barbary Coast (1935).

Barbary Coast

Miriam Hopkins is in danger in a publicity still for Barbary Coast (1935).

Barbary Coast

Joel McCrae and Miriam Hopkins make a handsome turn of the century couple on Barbary Coast (1935).  Joel was also second male lead in the next film Samuel Goldwyn produced with Howard Hawks directing, Come and Get It.

Barbary Coast

Edward G Robinson is owner of the Bella Donna Casino in 1899 San Francisco in Barbary Coast (1935).

Barbary Coast

Barbary Coast (1935) may not be one of Howard Hawks’ masterpieces, but it is certainly a 30s classic, with a great cast, great story and great production values by producer Samuel Goldwyn, the first of four films Sam produced with Hawks directing.

Barbary Coast

Miriam Hopkins in a costume by Omar Kiam for Barbary Coast (1935).  Omar was born in Monterrey, Mexico and had 31 costuming credits from 1934 to 1939.  His career highlights include Les Miserables (1935), These Three. Dodsworth, Come and Get It, A Star is Born, Stella Dallas, The Hurricane, The Adventures of Marco Polo and Wuthering Heights.

Barbary Coast

Edward G Robinson and Miriam Hopkins in Barbary Coast (1935), written by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur.

Barbary Coast

Edward G Robinson sports his fanciest dress pants, vest, poofy tie and one dangly earring as Louis Chamalis in Barbary Coast (1935).

Ceiling Zero

James Cagney and June Travis in a publicity still for Ceiling Zero (1936).  June was a spirited Hawksian woman, but it didn’t lead to much of a career.

Ceiling Zero

James Cagney as pilot Dizzy Davis in a publicity still for Ceiling Zero (1936), written by Spig Wead, who was played by John Wayne in John Ford’s Wead biopic The Wings of Eagles (1957).

Ceiling Zero

 

James Cagney as Dizzy Davis and June Travis as Tommy Thomas in Ceiling Zero (1936).  June was born in Chicago and had 35 acting credits in her career, from 1935 to Monsters A Go Go in 1965.  Ceiling Zero is her only career highlight, although she was support to Bette Davis in The Star (1952), notable mostly for Bette’s classic line “What a dump!”

Ceiling Zero

James Cagney, June Travis and Pat O’Brien in a Hawksian triangle in Ceiling Zero (1936).  Is James’s hand pushing away Pat, or is it more affectionate?

Ceiling Zero

 

James Cagney as Dizzy Davis in a publicity still for Ceiling Zero (1935)

James Cagney as Dizzy Davis in a publicity still for Ceiling Zero (1936).