Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Original lobby card with Ruth Taylor as Lorelei Lee in the original silent screen version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1928)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

original lobby card for the original 1928 silent film version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Ruth Taylor and Alice White in the original 1928 silent version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Alice White as Dorothy Shaw in a publicity still for the original 1928 silent film version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Malcolm St Clair was born in Los Angeles and had 101 directing credits from a 1919 short to 1948.  He directed three of Laurel and Hardy’s weak 1940s features.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

The popular 1953 version is based mostly on the 1949 Broadway musical version, which was based on the original 1928 silent version, which was based on a popular novel by Anita Loos. who was the authority on the modern woman of the day.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Ruth Taylor and Alice White as Lorelei Lee and Dorothy Shaw in the original 1928 silent version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

print ad for the original 1928 film version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Ruth Taylor and Alice White as Lorelei Lee and Dorothy Shaw in a publicity still for the original 1928 silent film version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), made popular by Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes premiered Jan 15, 1928, but no surviving parts survive.  The 1953 version with Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell was based primarily on the 1949 Broadway musical with Carol Channing.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

foreign lobby card for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

foreign lobby card for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Carol Channing as Lorelei Lee in the 1949 Broadway musical version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Howard Hawks and Marilyn Monroe on the set of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).  Howard said Marilyn wasn’t as difficult as she later became after the film made her an enduring superstar.  Howard’s quote was perhaps directed at Billy Wilder, who worked with Marilyn twice after she became a superstar.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Marilyn Monroe and George Winslow in an original publicity still for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)