Today We Live

Gary Cooper as Lt Richard Bogard in Today We Live (1933).  Gary made two more films with Howard Hawks.  Both were much more successful and rewarding.  In 1941 Gary earned an Oscar as Sergeant York, and the following year he was Professor Potts opposite Barbara Stanwyck in the comedy classic Ball of Fire.

Today We Live

More emphasis seems to have been placed on Joan Crawford’s publicity stills for Today We Live (1933) than on a dramatically interesting story, despite the involvement of William Faulkner.

Today We Live

In addition to Gary Cooper as Lt Bogard, Joan Crawford was also romanced by Robert Young as Lt Claude Hope and Franchot Tone as Lt Ronnie Boyce-Smith in Today We Live (1933), a dramatically weak effort except for the action highlights.

Today We Live


Joan Crawford appears unselfconscious in some kind of clown costume for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Today We Live is Howard Hawks’ 14th film.

Today We Live premiered Mar 3, 1933.

Today We Live

MGM executives unsuccessfully turned Today We Live (1933), a Howard Hawks, William Faulkner action adventure drama, into a Joan Crawford romance.  It would be the first and last time Hawks worked at MGM.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford as Englishwoman Diana Boyce in one of her many publicity stills for Today We Live (1933)

Today We Live

Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford in an awkward pose for Today We Live (1933), Howard Hawks’ first weak film.  He made only three more weak films in his career:  A Song is Born, Land of the Pharaohs and Red Line 7000.  Even his weakest films all had terrific action (or musical) highlights.  All his other films range from the middling to the essential masterpieces.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford and Gary Cooper made one film together, Today We Live (1933).  They were not convincing as a romantic couple.

Today We Live

Joan Crawford’s wardrobe by Adrian for Today We Live (1933) was frequently over the top ridiculous.  She was also unconvincing in her performance of a wealthy English woman during World War I.

The Prizefighter and the Lady

Max Baer in a publicity still for The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933), his film debut.  He had another 21 acting credits through 1958, all unremarkable.  More importantly, he was world heavyweight champ for exactly one year, from Jun 14, 1934 to Jun 13, 1935.  He was also father to Max Baer Jr, best known for 272 episodes of The Beverly Hillbillies as dimwit son Jethro Bodine, and in a few episodes Jethro’s twin sister Jethrine Bodine.

The Prizefighter and the Lady

The Prizefighter and the Lady is Howard Hawks’ 15th film.

The Prizefighter and the Lady premiered Nov 10, 1933.

The Prizefighter and the Lady


Max Baer and Myrna Loy in a publicity still for The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933).  While at MGM, Howard Hawks developed the project for MGM stars Clark Gable and Jean Harlow, but without any real power at the studio, Max and Myrna were cast instead.  Howard filmed the first few scenes and then quit/was replaced.  While he went from studio to studio for the remainder of his career, he never went back to MGM.  Furthermore, Myrna’s character in the film is a sophisticated showgirl, but dressed in an apron in the publicity still, the studio is promoting a much different image for her.

The Prizefighter and the Lady

Boxer Primo Carnera behind the scenes of The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) with Myrna Loy.  Primo had 22 acting credits dating back to 1931, often in Italy, and through Hercules Unchained in 1957.  Primo was a real professional boxer from 1928 to 1945 and stood 6’7 1/2″.

The Prizefighter and the Lady

When Howard Hawks left The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) after filming the first few scenes, he was replaced by WS (one take) Van Dyke.